Canine Orthopedic Problems

Walking the DogsImage by Douglas Brown via Flickr
Here are some orthopedic problems in dogs. They are classified into 3 for your convenience.

Deformity

Achondroplasia
Signs: Unusually short and bent limbs, abnormal gait, decreased agility, X-ray evidence.

Treatment: Weight control, properly balanced diet, anti-inflammatory medications.

Hip and Elbow Dysplasia
Signs: Limping, discomfort, swelling, joint looseness in hips, joint tension in elbow, abnormal shape of joint members, X-ray evidence.

Treatment: Weight control, properly balanced diet, anti-inflammatory medications.

Patellar Luxation
Signs: Limping, skipping, loose patellar supporting tissues, shallow patellar groove, line of tension
between tibia-patella-quadriceps muscle is off-center, X-ray evidence.

Treatment: Surgical correction in moderate to severe cases; otherwise, manage discomfort on an “as needed” basis with anti-inflammatory medications, nutraceuticals and weight control.

Disorder

Hypertrophic psteodystrophy (HOD) (Seldom seen in dogs less than 40 pounds.)
Signs: Large breed, rapidly growing older puppy, limping, pain in all four limbs, fever, lethargy, X-ray evidence of distinctive patterns at and above the growth plates of long bones.

Treatment: Evaluate the diet for imbalance of minerals and for over-supplementation, manage discomfort on an “as needed” basis with anti-inflammatory medications, rest and nutraceuticals in proper amounts. Consider antibiotic and cortisone therapy.

Infection
Signs: Swelling, fever, pain, swollen regional lymph nodes.

Treatment: Antibiotics, surgical drainage, anti-inflammatory medications.

Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCP), also called aseptic necrosis of femoral head (Seldom seen in dogs more than 40 pounds.)
Signs: Small breeds about 5 to 10 months of age, gradual disuse of a rear leg, pain and stiffness of a hip joint, X-ray evidence of distinctive patterns of degeneration within the femoral head.

Treatment: Usually requires femoral head/neck resection and physical therapy; consider total hip replacement.

Panosteitis (Seldom seen in dogs less than 40 pounds.)
Signs: Mid-sized to large breed, rapidly growing older pup, shifting lameness of all four joints, X-ray
evidence of distinctive patterns within marrow cavity of long bones.

Treatment: Rest and manage discomfort on an “as needed” basis with anti-inflammatory medications and nutraceuticals.

Injury

Bone fracture
Signs: Crack or break in the shaft or end of a bone, sudden pain, swelling, X-ray evidence.

Treatment: Surgery or precise splinting.

Dislocation
Signs: Separation of two joint parts that results in tearing and trauma to joint supporting tissues, bleeding, swelling, pain, abnormal location of the anatomical part, X-ray evidence.

Treatment: Surgery or manipulation to replace separated parts, immobilization and gradual return to function. May need surgical intervention.

Epiphyseal fracture
Signs: Separation fracture near the end of a bone along a growth plate line, sudden pain, swelling, X-ray evidence.

Treatment: Surgery or precise splinting.

Osteochondritis Dissecans
Signs: Limping on a front leg, discomfort when leg is fully extended or flexed, X-ray evidence of shoulder joint.

Treatment: Surgical correction in most cases; otherwise, manage discomfort on an “as needed” basis with anti-inflammatory medications, nutraceuticals and extended forced rest.

Sprain
Signs: Stretched joint supporting tissues which leads to swelling, bruising, pain and disuse.

Treatment: Rest, anti-inflammatory medications and physical therapy.

Enhanced by Zemanta

1 comment:

  1. rotator cuff tear

    We are a medical office specializing in the treatment of orthopedic problems such as sports injuries, joint, bone pain and more information then visit - Website: totalsportsmedicine.com

    Contact Us:>

    10105 Banburry Cross Dr. Suite 445 Las Vegas, Nevada 89144
    PHONE:(702) 475.4390 FAX: (702) 951.5456

    ReplyDelete

Chitika